Valencia It has a historic center adorned with palm trees and orange trees, a curious bullring, modernist buildings such as the Central Market and other avant-garde buildings led by the City of Arts and Sciences. In this Levantine city, watching the sunset in the Albufera is mandatory, as is sharing a good rice or paella. If you have a few extra days to explore it or want to see beyond the emblematic and typical buildings, write down these five lesser-known places worth visiting.


Museum of Fine Arts of Valencia.


All the museums that can be visited for free in Valencia

Monforte Garden

Statues in the Monforte Garden in Valencia.
Statues in the Monforte Garden in Valencia.

Neoclassical in style, the Monforte Garden It is a bubble of disconnection in the Valencia center (Spanish Legion Street s/n). It is an orchard converted into a garden in the 19th century and currently houses a bonsai free exhibition and a mansion in French academic and Rococo style.


Keukenhof, in Holland


The 10 most spectacular European gardens to visit at least once in your life: one of them is in Spain

Balcony of Valencia City Hall

Valencia City Council.
Valencia City Council.

In general, the town halls of cities and towns are part of the tourist route, but not all of them can be visited (Plaza del Ayuntamiento, 1). Of Monday to Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. you can see part of its interior, as well as go out to the Town Hall Balcony.

Anti-aircraft shelters in Valencia

Bomba Gens air raid shelter, in Valencia.
Bomba Gens air raid shelter, in Valencia.

As silent witnesses, there are many Civil War air raid shelters that remain in Valencia. It was a hot spot in the conflict, as the government of the Second Republic moved to the city in 1936. There are about 50 bunkers spread throughout the city, in public and private buildings, but not all of them can be visited. For more information, consult the official tourism website Visit Valencia.

Museum of Silence

General Cemetery of Valencia.
General Cemetery of Valencia.

Something more gloomy, but surely a very interesting visit for tanotourism and history practitioners. He General Cemetery of Valencia (Calle Santo Domingo de Guzmán, 27) offers up to four tours to explore the tombs of illustrious and popular people of Valencia, like that of the painter Joaquín Sorolla.


Monument to Sorolla in Valencia.


A route through Valencia in the footsteps of Sorolla on the centenary of his death

Jewish House of Valencia

Facade of the Jewish House of Valencia.
Facade of the Jewish House of Valencia.

It is difficult for this to go unnoticed art-deco building with arabesque and oriental touches. The Jewish House It is an emblem of Ruzafa (Calle Castellón, 20), a multicultural and eclectic neighborhood. Built in 1930, it is called the Jewish House because of the David’s star which can be seen at the bottom of the façade and also by the supposed clandestine meetings that this community held inside.


El Saler Parador.


‘El Parador de las Tortugas’: a sanctuary hotel on the coast of Valencia for this threatened species

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